• Eddie Rogers, Minister

True News 4 U — History Past News — 08/10/2020


  1. Units of History - The Balearic Slingers DOCUMENTARY

  2. What French Revolution Hygiene Was Like

  3. How Napoleon Lost at Waterloo

  4. The Order of the Pug and the Age of Enlightenment

  5. Entire History of the Persian Achaemenid Empire (550-330 BC) / Ancient History Documentary

  6. The Insane Engineering of the P-47 Thunderbolt

  7. The Forgotten History of Sewing Machines

  8. What Life Was Like for Marie Antoinette's Children

  9. Nortraship: The Norwegian Fleet and WWII

  10. Hercules Mulligan: Patriot Spy

At Height of the 1918 Pandemic, NYC and Chicago Schools Stayed Open. Here's Why


In the fall of 1918, as the deadly second wave of the influenza pandemic known as the “Spanish flu” swept across the nation, schools in cities around the United States closed in order to limit contagion.


But in the nation’s two largest urban centers, New York and Chicago, public schools remained open—even during October 1918, the flu’s deadliest month, when some 195,000 Americans died. Health officials in both cities placed their bets on newly robust school hygiene and medical inspection programs, which reformers of the Progressive Era had put in place over the decades before the flu hit.


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Black Americans Who Served in WWII Faced Segregation Abroad and at Home


When the Selective Training and Service Act became the nation’s first peacetime draft law in September 1940, civil rights leaders pressured President Franklin D. Roosevelt to allow Black men the opportunity to register and serve in integrated regiments.


Although African Americans had participated in every conflict since the Revolutionary War, they had done so segregated, and FDR appointee Henry Stimson, the Secretary of War, was not interested in changing the status quo. With a need to shore up the U.S. Armed Forces as war intensified in Europe, FDR decided that Black men could register for the draft, but they would remain segregated and the military would determine the proportion of Blacks inducted into the service.


The compromise represented the paradoxical experience that befell the 1.2 million African American men who served in World War II: They fought for democracy overseas while being treated like second-class citizens by their own country.


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What on Earth Happened to the Circassians?


What on Earth happened to the Circassians? The Caucasus is an interesting region with a load of many diverse and unique peoples such as the Armenians, Georgians and Azerbaijanis, but what about the groups that you probably haven't heard of? Thousands of years before the present day, different peoples inhabited parts of Europe and the Near East who, linguistically-speaking, are entirely unrelated to the groups we see there today. The Circassians are an example of such an ancient people.


In today's video we're going to be looking at the history and culture of the Circassians and some of the surrounding Caucasian natives like the Abkhaz, Chechens, Ingush and Dagestanis. Thanks for watching!


Sources:

http://circassianidentity.blogspot.co...

https://abkhazworld.com/aw/abkhazians...

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Circ...

https://www.circassianworld.com/circa...

The Strange Path of the Trelawny Maroons


Almost from the moment African slaves were taken to Jamaica, they started escaping into the mountains of the island's interior. The Jamaican Maroons held off the British, but the Maroons of Trelawny Town would be given a unique path. The History Guy recalls the story of escaped slaves and warriors whose unique culture and history still affects societies on both sides of the Atlantic.


This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very few images of the actual event are available in the Public Domain, images of similar objects and events are used for illustration.


All events are portrayed in historical context and for educational purposes. No images or content are primarily intended to shock and disgust. Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. Non censuram.

Lew Wallace: Author, Politician, General


Lew Wallace was one of the most famous people in America. A general who saved the union by losing a battle, he met with Billy the Kid and authored one of the most influential novels of all time. The History Guy tells the forgotten story of possibly the most interesting person you've likely never heard of.


This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very few images of the actual event are available in the Public Domain, images of similar objects and events are used for illustration.

The Hiroshima Bombing Didn't Just End WWII—It Kick-Started the Cold War


Soon after arriving at the Potsdam Conference in July 1945, U.S. President Harry S. Truman received word that the scientists of the Manhattan Project had successfully detonated the world’s first nuclear device in a remote corner of the New Mexico desert.


On July 24, eight days after the Trinity test, Truman approached Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin, who along with Truman and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill (soon to be succeeded by Clement Attlee) made up the “Big Three” Allied leaders gathered at Potsdam to determine the post-World War II future of Germany.


According to Truman, he “casually mentioned” to Stalin that the United States had “a new weapon of unusual destructive force,” but Stalin didn’t seem especially interested. “All he said was that he was glad to hear it and hoped we would make ‘good use of it against the Japanese,’” Truman later wrote in his memoir, Year of Decisions.


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The Electoral College Was Nearly Abolished in 1970


On September 18, 1969, the U.S. House of Representatives voted by an overwhelming 338 to 70 to send a constitutional amendment to the Senate that would have dismantled the Electoral College, the indirect system by which Americans elect the president and vice president.


“It was the only time in American history that a chamber of Congress actually approved an amendment to abolish the Electoral College,” says Jesse Wegman, a member of the New York Times editorial board and author of Let the People Pick the President: The Case for Abolishing the Electoral College.


The House vote, which came in the wake of an extraordinarily close presidential election, mirrored national sentiment about scrapping an electoral system that allowed a candidate to win the presidency even while losing the popular vote. A 1968 Gallup poll found that 80 percent of Americans believed it was time to elect the nation’s highest office by direct popular vote.


Yet just a year later, the Senate bill that would have ended the Electoral College was dead in the water, filibustered by a cadre of Southern lawmakers intent on preserving the majority’s grip on electoral power in their states. Despite widespread bipartisan support for the amendment in both large and small states, the Senate came five votes shy of breaking the filibuster.


“It was a remarkable effort,” says Wegman of the late 1960s movement that came “painfully close” to killing the Electoral College. “We’ve never seen anything like it before, and I fear we may never see anything like it again.”


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How the Union Pulled Off a Presidential Election During the Civil War


The United States has never delayed a presidential election. But there was one instance in which some wondered if the country should: when the nation was embroiled in the Civil War.


The 1864 election was the second U.S. presidential election to take place during wartime (the first was during the War of 1812). Still, it wasn’t the logistics of carrying out a wartime election that made some people want to postpone it. Rather, it was the fact that by the spring of 1864, the Union had no clear path to victory, and many feared President Abraham Lincoln wouldn’t win reelection.


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Assault Helicopter Companies of the Vietnam War


Vietnam was not the first conflict to include helicopters, but much of the doctrine of their use was developed there. A coin sent by a viewer helps The History Guy to recall the forgotten story of the Assault Helicopter Companies of the War in Vietnam.


This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very few images of the actual event are available in the Public Domain, images of similar objects and events are used for illustration.

America's Secret Destiny: What you weren't taught in school! [Documentary]


The History of America is not what is taught in schools. What role did secret societies and occult orders play in our nation's founding? Why are there strange symbols embedded in the layout of Washington DC? Why is an secret owl hidden on the 1 dollar Bill and what does it represent? All this and more as we explore America's Secret Destiny: the history you weren't taught in schools!

Merlin's Stones: The History of the History of Stonehenge


Stonehenge is an iconic image of the British Isles. The monument is so ancient that the study of its history is ancient history. The History Guy reveals the surprisingly long history of the search for the meaning of perhaps the world's most famous neolithic monument.


This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very few images of the actual event are available in the Public Domain, images of similar objects and events are used for illustration.

Escape of the Red Sea Flotilla: RAMB I, RAMB II and Eritrea


Get your free trial of MagellanTV here: https://try.magellantv.com/historyguy/. It's an exclusive offer for our viewers: an extended, month-long trial, FREE. MagellanTV is a new kind of streaming service run by filmmakers with 2,000+ documentaries! Check out our personal recommendation and MagellanTV’s exclusive playlists:

https://www.magellantv.com/explore/hi...


In February 1941, as the East Africa Campaign was coming to a close, three Italian ships, RAMB I, RAMB II and Eritrea, had to make a run for an allied port. The fates of the three ships represented the shifting fortunes of the war. The History Guy recalls the forgotten history of three ships that demonstrated the "world" part of World War II.


This is original content based on research by The History Guy. Images in the Public Domain are carefully selected and provide illustration. As very few images of the actual event are available in the Public Domain, images of similar objects and events are used for illustration.



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